Curious Lola

Taira + Kyle

Here are some lovely snippets from Taira and Kyle’s wedding this fall on Camano Island. Taira’s bouquet consisted of four types of roses and stephanotis hand tied into an enormo bouquet. I loved working with this down to earth, fun-loving couple. And nice work on the rock, Kyle. Gorgeous.

Man flowers…

Well, these still maybe girly, but somewhat less fluffy than some of the English gardens I’ve seen groom’s and their packs awkwardly sporting. Maybe truly manly boutonnieres will be a future post topic…. I’m envisioning legos, transformers, a pez dispenser.

I had a few roses left from a late November wedding (post coming soon) and thought I would make some man adornments (mandornments?… nevermind) that could reflect the mood of the wedding without sacrificing masculinity.

In general, I think man’s look is more balanced with a very petite boutonniere. That way it supports the ensemble rather than bombards it. There are so many other places I’d rather look than the man’s lapel. Most of my leftover roses, however, fell into the bombardment category. Here’s what happened.

Boutonniere 1: Forest-inspired (can you sense an obsession yet?)

What is it made of?-  ‘Anna’ Rose, Brassilia, Ruscus, lichen, twig. I love the subtle colors in this rose. The outer petals (removed) actually transition to a magenta stripe.

Boutonniere 2: Titanic Lace… Okay, so this one is totally girly. But I love the flower so much.

What is it made of?- ‘Titanic’ Rose with lace wrap. My endlessly patient model cringed when I forced this one upon him. But I like it.

Boutonniere 3: Prairie

What is it made of?-  ‘Vendela’ Rose, Snowberry (one of my faves), scabiosa pod, and a couple sprigs of grass flowers. This rose is a smaller rose and was a good scale. The grass I thought twice about but now I love. It adds some airy, country feel to it.

Boutonniere 4: Sea Disco

What is it made of?- ‘Vendela’ Rose, bear grass, turquoise and green sequins with black sequin wrap! YES!

Boutonniere 5: Birch

What is it made of?- ‘Mt. Everest’ Rose, Some kind of beach growing grass, and birch bark.- Given the chance again I think I would forgo the white bow.

Boutonniere 6: Autumn garden

What is it made of?- Asters, Ceanothus (purple), myrica foliage, spiraea seed head, and twine. I love this. It’s like a miniature bouquet all with items pulled from the garden… and garage.

Boutonniere 7: Pink

What is it made of?- ‘Titanic’ Rose, brassilia, and groundcover roses with blue ribbon wrap. This rose is definitely a big one, but with a shorter stem and the small accents, I think it looks balanced and fantastic. And though it is way pinker than the other pink boutonniere with the same rose, I didn’t get any weird looks from my model.

Stay tuned for wedding photos, Rose analyses, and easy arrangements involving fun with rocks.

Forest Inspired Centerpieces

These centerpieces were made for a beautiful dinner event at one of Seattle University’s many elegant event spaces. The centerpieces were made possible by a convenient Alder tree that blew down in my yard.  Flowers included delicious chocolate sunflowers, light orange alstroemerias, orange asters, silvery frog balls, love in a mist pods, echinacea heads (petals removed),  a dyed red willowy eucalyptus, and of course lichen encrusted branch tips as promised. I’m pretty sure that if I were a tiny fantastical forest creature I would like to live in this arrangement.

Gallery Dinner

Vachon Room at Seattle University's Fine Arts Building

table top

The large low arrangement is made with pieces of Doug fir bark

table top closup

After the event, some of these peices went to live out their lives at a local coffee shop. Luckily, the light was good and I was able to get some better closeups.

Table 1 large loglogs against graffiti walllittle logs

marketing logslogs and espresso

lichen love…

I went camping this Halloween at Wallace Falls with my sweetie. I came across so much lichen that was so beautiful in the damp forest. Some of it scaley looking, some of it soft and hair like, and some of it growing into antler-like branches. All blue and glowing in the dark forest. The lichen inspired me not only to learn more, but to use lichen and logs in a centerpiece job the following week for a gallery dinner.

Here are some of the lichen found on the forest floor.

Hairy lichen

Common name: Witch's Hair-

Branchy lichen and friends

3 lichens

Interesting stuff about lichen…Lichen turns out to be a composite organism of green algae and fungus, the fungus providing structure and protection, and the alga providing the ability to photosynthesize. I always thought lichen was a parasitic organism but it turns out I was wrong. Lichen do not have roots and do not harm their host (mostly the bark of trees where I live). They get their water and nutrients from the air, and the moisture on the bark. They are essential to Northwest forests in that they can take nitrogen out of the air and make it into a usable form by other plants. So when the lichen falls to the forest floor and decays, the forests nitrogen poor soils are enriched. Also, because of their sensitivity to air pollutants, many NW lichens are used as indicators for clean air… or unclean air. These lichen discovered on my trip have been used in the past as dye by native communities. One is currently used in the perfume industry.

See the next post for how lichen was incorporated into the gallery dinner centerpieces.

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Welcome to Flower-Brained, a blog dedicated to floral design, landscape design, and interesting tidbits I’ve learned by exploring the professions of the floral industry and landscape architecture. You will find writings about design, color, weddings, indoor and outdoor plants, craft, and sculpture.

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